Chicken or Egg, or Tiramisu?

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Image source: simply-delicious-food.com

When you think of the old debate – what was first, a chicken or an egg – it occurs me that it does not matter what was first. What really matters is that without either of the two (or both), we would have never had the best desserts in our culture. Think: Victorian sponge, Pan di Spagna, Crema Pasticcera, Tiramisu, cupcakes and muffins, brownies and meringues – all these bites of indulgence demand an EGG.  Continue reading “Chicken or Egg, or Tiramisu?”

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Wrong steak for Trump. Macarons for Macron?

Emmanuelle Macron is baking macarons!.. Sorry, not particularly true, but I could not but indulge myself in this glorious pun. However, it is almost reality. The French presidential candidate went to the patisserie school’s class on eclairs and other airy concoctions of the French bakers. The energetic politician did not pretend to excel in baking, but definitely showed a good taste for upscale desserts.

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“LIVE: Our young apprentices have talent! I have less of it, as my first eclair shows”

Wait, who cares for the food visits of a presidential candidate – aren’t they a boring routine of a campaign? Believe me, the right bites matter and can win you the election. Why is it so embedded in the French political tradition that you MUST visit the butchers to impress voters?..

Eat your way to The Élysée Palace

This weekend Emmanuel Macron raised (the nutritional value of) his game and went to the butcher’s pavilion at the Rungis food market in Paris.

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Source: Paris Match


The Guardian
notes that is a typical move for a French politician – reaching out to the butchers, farmers and hardworking market vendors is a must-do of a campaign. Why so? Waking up at the dawn to salute the meat sellers at 6am is a sign of appreciation of good work and tradition.

As Macron was saying, many of these people had been selling meat to the people of France for 20-30 years – and perhaps even generations of their fathers had been doing the same before. A good steak, a bottle of noble wine and a fine eclair at the end of the meal – this is how food preferences of Emmanuel Macron reflect his “centre” position in politics. He is not left enough to praise a plain baguette with vin du table and not too right to cling to the escargot with Pomerol.

Bite the batty!

Do you remember the last time that a wrong meal cost a career to the politician? Exactly, the unfortunate Ed Miliband and his bacon batty malfunction. The UK Labour party member went to the ‘people’s market’ in the wee small hours of the morning on the 21st of May 2014 to sink his teeth into the bacon sandwich, the staple of the working class diet.
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The chewy number, though, resisted the attack – and the newspapers indulged in the embarrassing photos of the Labour leader struggling with the laid back snack. Is it not that the more sophisticated delicacies are easier to eat – it is just the bad coincidence that the bacon sarnie and the Labour politician did not click. The misbalance of a person and food led to the rising number of unconvinced voters.

There will be (no) blood

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There is a gossip that the US president Donald Trump is a big fan of McDonald’s and steakhouses. When he goes to the latest, he orders his steak… well-done, which makes the hearts of the meatlovers sink. As Antoine Bourden mentioned in his memoirs, chefs throw the worst pieces of meat on the grill for those “well-done” ignoranti. The overfrying of a steak kicks out all the juice and flavour – hence, who would trust a nuanced decision to a man who does not know his steak?
As our little foodie political investigation reveals, the food choices mean a lot to the reputation of political leaders. Not only these gentlemen and ladies in power have to eat well – they also need to communicate what and why they eat to us, people. Down to earth, loyal to your plate, true to your country.